Three reasons why an intersectional approach to women’s peace and security agenda is important

Editorial / Opinion Piece / Blog Post

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November 8, 2019

Three reasons why an intersectional approach to women’s peace and security agenda is important

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By Sagal Bafo,

October 31st marks 19 years since the historical recognition of the unique gendered impact of violence on the well-being of women and girls.

The adoption of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 was the first time where women rights and leadership were acknowledged as vital components in peace building and post-conflict reconstruction. It changed the way the international community conceptualised security, and there were calls for better protection of women and girls in conflict, as well as the participation of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution, peace-making and peacebuilding.

The women, peace and security agenda has been one of my main focuses academically and professionally, and over the last few years, I have had the privilege to attend panel discussions and community events exploring the role of women in post-conflict transitions.

However, through my experiences, I realised that the approach to women participation in peace processes had become simplified to a matter of filling women-specific quotas, as described by Sahana Dharmapuri – an independent advisor on gender, peace, and security – a ‘adding women and stirring’.

In 2015, women made up only 2 per cent of mediators, 5 per cent of witnesses and signatories, and 8 per cent of negotiators in peace processes.

Click here to read the full article published by Oxfam on 1 November 2019.

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