The Political Participation of Indigenous Women in the Ecuadorian Congress: Unfinished Business

Case Study

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July 17, 2013

The Political Participation of Indigenous Women in the Ecuadorian Congress: Unfinished Business

Latin America is populated by some 40 million indigenous people of a total population of about 500 million. Among the countries with a predominantly indigenous population are Guatemala, Bolivia and Ecuador. In Guatemala, the indigenous population has been estimated to account for anywhere from 43 to 70 per cent of the population, depending on the particular study. In Guatemala, 90 per cent of the indigenous population is poor, and 76 per cent lives in extreme poverty. Bolivia, whose population is 80 per cent indigenous, is in a similar situation, with 80 per cent of the population living in poverty...

In Latin America, indigenous women’s political participation is recent. While there are cases that show the quantitative and qualitative advance of women generally, it is no less certain that this advance is still incipient among indigenous women. In Ecuador, in particular, and Latin America more generally, the history of encounters and clashes that the indigenous peoples have had with the political system has provoked harsh discrimination against indigenous women and their exclusion...

This case study analyses the participation of indigenous women in the Ecuadorian Congress, beginning with a general overview of the political participation of the indigenous peoples. In addition, it will identify some of the most important lessons learned, key challenges, and strategies for seeking the inclusion and full political participation of indigenous women in public affairs.

We invite you to read the full case study published by our partner, International IDEA

Resource type: 
Region: 
Author: 
Nina Pacari
Publisher: 
International IDEA
Publication year: 
2002