Despite trailblazing victories by women, many girls reluctant to enter politics

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Despite trailblazing victories by women, many girls reluctant to enter politics

 The midterm elections brought landmark victories for female candidates. North country voters elected the first female sheriff in New York and the youngest female congresswoman in U.S. history. Yet even with more women than ever sitting in positions of political power, a recent study by the Girl Scouts shows that only 32 percent of girls and young women see themselves as future political leaders.

“Here in the north country, a lot of good things are happening; it’s not just the old boys club that are running things,” said Jefferson County Board of Legislators Chairwoman Carolyn D. Fitzpatrick. She said rather than look at the negative, everyone should look at the positive and encourage future growth.

Girl Scouts of the USA recently released poll findings showing that while the majority of today’s teen and tween girls are interested in politics — 67 percent — and most are engaged in political, civic or leadership activities — 93 percent — only a minority of them, at 37 percent, are interested in pursuing a career in politics. The poll was conducted in September by the Girl Scout Research Institute with a national sample of more than 1,000 girls in the U.S. between the ages of 11 and 17.

We invite our users to read the full article published November 5 2014