Indian politician quits after protests against giving women stronger voice

World News

 Back

Indian politician quits after protests against giving women stronger voice

GUWAHATI, India (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The chief minister of India's remote northeastern state of Nagaland has resigned after facing increasing pressure for failing to quell weeks of violent protests by tribal groups opposing a move to give women a stronger political voice.

Former Chief Minister T.R. Zeliang announced plans to allocate one-third of the seats in local urban authorities for women in January, sparking protests by male-dominated indigenous groups who said it goes against their customary laws.

The protests, which began on Jan. 27, have turned violent with tribal groups torching government vehicles and blocking roads. Two people died and dozens have been injured.

Nagaland has never elected a woman legislator. Customary laws in the state also bar women from heading village councils, land ownership and inheritance rights.

In the world's largest democracy, women hold only 12 percent of seats in the lower and upper houses of parliament combined, says the Inter-Parliamentary Union - just over half the global average of 23 percent.

Click here to read the full story published by the Thomas Reuters Foundation on 20 February 2017. 

News: 
Region: